More people than ever face hunger in Southern Africa

World Food Programme (WFP) Zimbabwe

World Food Programme (WFP) 

from MARCUS MUSHONGA in Harare, Zimbabwe
HARARE, (CAJ News) A RECORD 45 million people in Southern Africa are food insecure as the region enters the peak of the lean season.

The season runs from January to March.

Zimbabwe is the worst affected by the deficit but Eswatini, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia and Zambia are grappling with shortages in a region comprising of 16 countries.

The severe food shortage is the worst to ever hit the entire Southern African Development Community (SADC) region over decades.

The World Food Programme (WFP) requires a whopping US$284 million (R4 billion) to meet urgent food needs in affected countries.

The agency stated that as climate-related natural disasters were becoming more frequent, multi-year funding was crucial for sustainable and effective impact.

“The scale of the region’s hunger crisis is unprecedented,” WFP stated.

The seriousness of the situation is largely a consequence of widespread drought with Southern Africa having had one normal rainy season in the last five years.

Cyclones and persistent flooding have also affected food production.

Rising food prices and mounting joblessness, posing a risk of political instability in affected countries is worsening the plight of millions in affected countries.

Hunger is also deepening acute malnutrition in particularly vulnerable communities.

“The crisis could deepen this year,” WFP warned.

Weather experts have also forecast an increased likelihood of below-normal rainfall in many parts of the region in January-to-March 2020.

This is the crucial growing period ahead of the main April-May harvest.

The food crisis has culminated in families having fewer meals, an increase in school dropouts and distress sale of livestock and other assets.

– CAJ News

Short URL: http://cajnewsafrica.com/?p=32872

Posted by on Jan 17 2020. Filed under Africa & World, Featured, Food & Drinks, HOSPITALITY, National, News, Regional. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry
  • Tony Palmer

    To describe this situation as a climate emergency is racist and the green movement, regardless of the science and the good intentions of some devout ecologists, have no right to seek political leverage from the suffering of the African people who have sought decade after decade and century after century to remain true to the rhythms of the earth. Technologies as advanced as ‘water well drilling’ and ‘irrigation’ exist and can and should be implemented successfully to mitigate the effects of drought, which in no way negates, but rather enhances the dignity of those who donate to the African cause, and the Africans themselves, whose courage and and continuity in the face of hardship inspires it.

Connect to CAJ News on Facebook

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Photo Gallery

Log in
All material © CAJ News Africa. Material may not be published or reproduced in any form without prior written permission.