World Bank rates SA as suistanable energy leader

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By TINTSWALO BALOYI

JOHANNESBURG, (CAJ News) – AN increasing number of developing countries, including South Africa, are emerging as leaders in sustainable energy with robust policies to support energy access, renewables and energy efficiency.
However, there is huge room for improvement across every region in the world and particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa.
This is according to a new report by World Bank, which rates South Africa highly alongside Brazil, China, India, Mexico, Turkeyand Vietnam.
Entitled RISE (Regulatory Indicators for Sustainable Energy), the report identifies important policy gaps across all regions, and highlights opportunities for rapid progress.
Sub-Saharan Africa is the world’s least electrified continent, where 600 million people still live without electricity.
As many as 40 percent of Sub-Saharan African countries surveyed by RISE have barely taken any of the policy measures needed to accelerate energy access, compared to less than 10 percent of Asian countries.
Exceptions include Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda which have strong policy frameworks.
Rachel Kyte, Chief Executive Officer and Special Representative to the United Nations Secretary-General on Sustainable Energy for All, said RISE offered policymakers and investors the most detailed country-level insight yet into how we can level the playing field for renewable energy worldwide.
“Smart policy can accelerate this transition,” said Kyte.

–CAJ News

 

Short URL: http://cajnewsafrica.com/?p=18174

Posted by on Feb 15 2017. Filed under Africa & World, Energy, Featured, Finance, National, Regional, Solar & wind. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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