Prisoners tortured in detention

Inmates are pictured after voting at a polling staion in Pollsmoor Prison, Cape Town,14 April 2004. South Africans voted with enthusiasm Wednesday in the third elections since the end of apartheid, with the African National Congress set to return to power on a mandate to fight AIDS, crime and poverty.  AFP PHOTO/ANNA ZIEMINSKI        (Photo credit should read ANNA ZIEMINSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

Inmates are pictured after voting at a polling staion in Pollsmoor Prison, Cape Town,14 April 2004. South Africans voted with enthusiasm Wednesday in the third elections since the end of apartheid, with the African National Congress set to return to power on a mandate to fight AIDS, crime and poverty. AFP PHOTO/ANNA ZIEMINSKI (Photo credit should read ANNA ZIEMINSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

From MARIA MACHARIA in Nairobi, Kenya
NAIROBI, (CAJ News) – A new partnership is envisaged to protect the rights of prisoners and reduce their torture in detention.
The Institute for Security Studies (ISS) and the United Kingdom-based Omega Research Foundation are working with government officials and civil society to help address the issue.
Each year, thousands of incidents of assault and torture of inmates and pre-trial detainees by prison officials are recorded in African countries.
Among other disturbing trends, it emerged in South Africa, certain kinds of security equipment banned in other parts of the world are authorised for use in correctional centres..
ISS and Omega reported the rigorous monitoring and reporting is essential to protect their rights in line with domestic laws and regional and international standards.
Government officials, oversight bodies, lawyers and journalists from Kenya, Malawi and South Africa have been trained to identify law enforcement and security equipment and the medical, legal and human rights implications of their use.
The training workshop is part of a broader initiative funded by the European Union Instrument for Democracy and Human Rights to raise awareness about the manufacture, trade and use of law enforcement and security equipment that could facilitate torture and ill treatment in Africa.
Steve Ogolla, Human Rights Officer at the International Commission of Jurists in Kenya, said the training highlighted the pressing need to carry out an audit of law enforcement equipment used in Kenya and identify those that can facilitate torture.

CAJ News

Short URL: http://cajnewsafrica.com/?p=13928

Posted by on Jul 5 2016. Filed under Africa & World, Featured, National, News, Regional. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Poll

Who do you want to lead South Africa ?

Connect to CAJ News on Facebook

Subscribe to our Newsletter

Log in
All material © CAJ News Africa. Material may not be published or reproduced in any form without prior written permission.