Shock as child suicide bombings increase tenfold

Jos bomb blast

Jos bomb blast

LAGOS, (CAJ News) – THE number of children involved in the suicide bomb attacks by the Boko Haram sect has increased more than tenfold over the past year.

This is according to data released by the United Nations Children’s Fund, which indicates the number of minors, mostly girls, has increased from four in 2014 to 44 in 2015.

More than 75 per cent of the children involved in the attacks are girls.

The attacks have been carried out in Nigeria, the book Haram base, and neighbouring countries as Cameroon, Chad and Niger.

UNICEF released the statistics ahead of the commemorations of the two years since the Boko Haram sect abducted more than 200 schoolgirls at a primary school in Chibok in the northeastern state of Borno.

It is feared some of these girls might have been used in the recent wave of suicide bombings.

“Let us be clear: these children are victims, not perpetrators,” said Manuel Fontaine, UNICEF Regional Director for West and Central Africa.

He slammed the Islamic militant Boko Haram sect for the trend.

“Deceiving children and forcing them to carry out deadly acts has been one of the most horrific aspects of the violence in Nigeria and in neighbouring countries.”

UNICEF said between January 2014 and February 2016, Cameroon recorded the highest number of suicide attacks involving children (21), followed by Nigeria (17) and Chad (2).

The UN agency said over the past two years, nearly 1 in 5 suicide bombers was a child and three quarters of these children were girls.

– CAJ News

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Posted by on Apr 12 2016. Filed under Africa & World, Featured, National, News, Regional. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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